• Companion
  • Somerset
  • Gelding
  • 3 years old
  • 12.2hh
Add me to your stable

Share this profile

Meet Jimmy

Share this profile

Jimmy is ready to find a non ridden companion home where he can have a little interaction daily from a rehomer and equine friends to bond with. He would be suited to a gelding home as he was only gelded in October 2021. He is very inquisitive and loves attention from people, often falling asleep in the field when he is groomed. Jimmy is good in a stable and although he lives out, this could be part of his routine in a home. As he does like to play with his friends in the field, he would be suited to ponies who also enjoy this. If another pony was ridden, he could learn to stay on his own for short periods after gradual introduction. Jimmy would need restricted grazing but may need supplementary forage in winter. He has also worn a turn out rug when the weather was very wet and cold.

Headshot of Jimmy

Important stuff

Jimmy can never be ridden or driven.

All equines in our centres are regularly assessed by a team of experts including a vet, physiotherapist and farrier, and these assessments have found that Jimmy is not suitable to be worked.

History

Jimmy came in to our care in the Autumn of 2021 as a welfare concern.

More about Jimmy

Breed Hackney
Colour Brown
Type Pony
Stabling/Shelter Can live out all year with shelter
Turnout Geldings only
To catch in the field Excellent
Hay/Feed May require extra forage - grazing dependent
Feet Unshod, good to trim
Rugs May need turn out rug in winter
Behavioural considerations Jimmy is a very friendly pony and loves to play with his field friends. He would benefit from a confident handler
Health considerations None
Bedding Straw or shavings
Rehoming fee(£) 20
?

Need help?

If you have any further questions or need to get in touch with us please check our Need help page for guidance.

Please check our Need Help page for guidance. Visit our help section

Jimmy is at Glenda Spooner Farm, Somerset

Do you want to offer Jimmy a home?

To apply to rehome, add Jimmy to your virtual stable and then complete our online application form.

Add Jimmy to your stable

  1. Find and apply for a horse

    Browse or search our range of horses ready for rehoming (the word 'horse' includes horses, ponies, donkeys and their hybrids). Once you have selected your horse(s), click the 'Apply to Rehome' button to go to our online application form. Your details will be saved to make it easier for you to check the status of your application as well as to apply for other horses in the future.

  2. Application reviewed

    The team at our Rescue and Rehoming Centre will review your application and get back to you as soon as they can, usually within two weeks. Do keep an eye on your junk email if you don't hear from us!

  3. Meet the horse

    If we think you sound like the best match for that horse, we will call and ask you to visit the Centre in order to meet them. If you intend to rehome a companion, we may ask you to groom or handle the horse. For ridden, driven, youngster or project horses, we will also assess your riding/driving and groundwork abilities as appropriate.

  4. Home visit

    Once everyone is happy that the right match has been found, one of our friendly Field Officers will visit you and the location where you intend to keep the horse. This is simply to check that the site is safe and suitable for the horse you have been matched with.

  5. Vet check

    Once our Field Officer has visited and approved the location, our vet will give the horse one last check before you take them home.

  6. Take your horse home!

    Once these steps have been successfully completed, you will need to become a World Horse Welfare ChampionPlus member, pay your one-off rehoming fee and sign the Rehoming Agreement. Once that is done, you can take the horse home!

We've included our top six questions here but you can find the full list here.

  1. How often is the site updated?

    Our rehoming pages are updated on a weekly basis, usually on a Wednesday afternoon, so please do keep checking back if you can’t see a horse who’s right for you straight away. We generally advise checking once a week to make sure you don’t miss the opportunity to apply, as ridden horses are often extremely popular and can receive a large number of applications very quickly.

  2. Can you add me to a waiting list?

    We no longer hold a waiting list as, due to the sheer volume of applications we receive, we found this not to be an effective system. Instead, we ask potential rehomers to monitor the website and apply for any individual horse which is of interest. However, we hope people will be able to register for email alerts in future. Our rehoming pages are updated on a weekly basis, usually on a Wednesday afternoon, so please do keep checking back if you can’t see the horse who’s right for you straight away.

  3. Do you have catchment areas?

    We don’t have catchment areas so you are welcome to apply for a horse at any farm, but do bear in mind that you will usually be asked to travel to the relevant farm to meet your chosen horse and you would also have to arrange transport to take the horse home should you be successful – plus not all our horses can travel long distances.

  4. Can I come and see a horse I’m interested in?

    You will need to apply through our website and we will invite the person who appears to be the best match for the horse to come and meet them. Please note that you can only visit the farm to meet the horse if you have been invited by the team.

  5. Do you rehome ridden or driven horses?

    We do rehome ridden and driven horses, but they are often extremely popular and can receive a large number of applications very quickly. These horses can be found by searching the relevant category. If you are looking for a horse who has the potential to be ridden/driven in the future, we do have a range of other categories in our rehoming scheme such as companion with potential, youngster or project horse which are searchable under the ‘Prospect’ category. These categories allow currently non-ridden horses to be rehomed to a suitably experienced home with the aim of bringing them into work in the future. If you’re interested in rehoming a horse with the potential to be brought into work but don’t personally have the experience to back the horse, we would still consider an application if you have an appropriately experienced support network.

  6. What costs are involved in rehoming?

    Before you take the horse home you will need to pay a one-off rehoming fee (displayed on the individual horse’s profile) and become a ChampionPlus Member of World Horse Welfare. You will need to maintain this membership for as long as the horse is with you – this is our way of ensuring that all of our rehomed horses are covered by third-party liability insurance. Our horses are not rehomed with any tack, rugs or equipment and rehomers are responsible for all day-to-day costs, including any veterinary fees, as well as transport from and to the relevant rehoming centre.

Share this profile with friends

Why rehome from World Horse Welfare

More horses from Glenda Spooner Farm

Jack The Lad Of Ludham (Murphy)
Jack The Lad Of Ludham (Murphy)
  • Companion
  • Glenda Spooner Farm
  • Gelding
  • 11 years old
  • 14.3hh
Tinker
Tinker
  • Companion
  • Glenda Spooner Farm
  • Mare
  • 12 years old
  • 13.0hh
Boris
Boris
  • Companion
  • Glenda Spooner Farm
  • Gelding
  • 2 years old
  • 11.2hh
Blazing Speed (Harley)
Blazing Speed (Harley)
  • Companion
  • Glenda Spooner Farm
  • Gelding
  • 14 years old
  • 13.1hh
Jack The Lad Of Ludham (Murphy)
Jack The Lad Of Ludham (Murphy)
  • Companion
  • Glenda Spooner Farm
  • Gelding
  • 11 years old
  • 14.3hh
Tinker
Tinker
  • Companion
  • Glenda Spooner Farm
  • Mare
  • 12 years old
  • 13.0hh
Boris
Boris
  • Companion
  • Glenda Spooner Farm
  • Gelding
  • 2 years old
  • 11.2hh
Blazing Speed (Harley)
Blazing Speed (Harley)
  • Companion
  • Glenda Spooner Farm
  • Gelding
  • 14 years old
  • 13.1hh
Get our latest news and rescue stories
Follow our story on social networks